14 Oct

#KBSKitabReview so far

On 21st July we started a hashtag series on instagram called ‘KBSKitabReview‘. The basic idea of starting this series is to help readers to select their next book to read. So here are the some reviews we have received so far.

The Sky is Falling & The Fifth Miracle Review by me. . .

#KBSKitabReview

#KBSKitabReview

  The Sky is Falling: This is my first book by Sidney Sheldon. The novel is about Dana Evans, a TV anchorwomen trying to find the killer who murdered the Winthrop family. The use of suspense is gripping & eye-popping. The writing is lucid that keeps you hooked till the end. Genre: fiction, thriller Rating: 4/5 The Fifth Miracle: The origin of life is one of the major puzzles that science is trying to solve since the dawn of human history. Paul Davies manages to engage the reader in an incredibly referenced & thoroughly researched exploration into life on other planets. Highly Recommended! Genre: non-fiction, sci-fi Rating: 4.5/5

Dil usy dhoond laya hai review by Areeba

 It’s a compilation of different afsany. It’s VERY WELL written, the characters and the dialogs are fantastic. Picking Asya Razaqqi for the first time was worth it. My rating: 4/5. Not full stars because a few afsany were written in same tone. Genre: Short stories

Notes from the Underground Review by Fiza Mari

A VERY WELL WRITTEN book about an isolated man who starts writing to an anonymous audience (believing he will never have readers) about his life, his confessions, his contradictory behavior and the inability to cope up with the society around him and how he believes that his intelligence is the reason of his misery and isolation. What makes this book so realistic is the fact that there are people who actually live such miserable lives. Do give it a read! Genre: philosophy Rating: 4.5/5

Past Imperfect Review by Raahat

I finished reading ‘Past Imperfect’ by Julian Fellows last night. “A gloriously funny, bumpy ride through the modern times”. The novel takes us back to the Season of 1968 and its lavish balls and parties, to the debutantes, to the eligible men who accompanied them. Damian Baxter is filthy rich (new money) but he has one concern which is becoming more urgent as the weeks go by and he gets nearer to his death, who should inherit his fortune. he doesn’t think he has any children but one day, a letter from an ex-GF suggests he may have fathered a child, the letter is anonymous, he needs someone to find out who the woman is, and that someone is Damian’s sworn enemy. it’s truly a bumpy ride, the balls, and the scenarios. I’d give it 3.9/5. Genre: Fiction

FanGirl Review by Manal

kbs3

A weak plot so it falls behind in the list of good contemporary novels but over all a nicely written young-adult. Rowell can do better. 2/5.

Manuscript found in Accra Review by Noor Unnahar

My newly found love: philosophy genre. It’s probably because I’ve been reading too much from Paulo Coelho. This book was the best one, after The Alchemist. If you’re looking for a quotes-and-wisdom filled nostalgic read, then Manuscript Found in Accra is a tremendous book. I rate it: 5/5
 

Karachi, You’re Killing Me! Review by Manal

Reading this book was like reading someone’s diary who’s very VERY whiny. Kind of funny at only a few parts. Waste of time otherwise. Horrible ending. 1/5.
 

Shadow and Bone Review by Manal

BEST BOOK EVER. The plot, the characters; everythingg! If you’re a fan of The Hunger Games & Divergent trilogy, you should definitely give a read. Lastly, before this book goes mainstream; calling dibs on Darkling and Mal both.  5/5 Genre: Fantasy.
You can also submit your book reviews by uploading a picture of a book cover on your instagram, write a short review with genre and it’s rating out 5 and tag it with #KBSKitabReview. You can find us on instagram to follow this series.
Written by Farman Shams Co-founder of #KHIBookSwap
21 Jul

#KBSKitabReview A Hashtag Series

Few months back I swapped 2 books at the KhiBookSwap meetup and finally I finished them. So I had an idea instead of sharing their reviews on goodreads or on this blog, we should start a hashtag series called ‘#KBSKitabReview‘ that might help some book buyers. Every month we will be featuring one best photo with this hashtag at our instagram account.

Here are the rules to be a part of this hashtag series:

1. Upload an image of a book with a short review, genre and its rating on your instagram.

2. Tag that photo with #kbskitabreview

And here is my first contribution to the #KBSKitabReview

#KBSKitabReview

#KBSKitabReview

Written by Farman Shams Co-founder of #KHIBookSwap

15 Jun

3 Book Reviews

We have found some interesting book reviews at our facebook group. So I thought they are worth sharing here.

The Stranger by Albert Camus

This book review has been shared by Syed Wajahat Ali

The Stranger by Albert Camus

The only sure thing in life is death. Human life is then a subtle tragedy, a march to nothingness while love, emotions, sorrow and happiness are all fragile and temporal abodes which entertain us for a time being till we embrace death which is the final fate that awaits everyone.

If the above makes sense to you, then Albert Camus’s “The Stranger” is one book that is bound to make a profound impact on your life.

Albert Camus’s “L’Étranger” otherwise known as “The Stranger” or “The Outsider” which aims to elaborate on Camus’s philosophy of the “Absurd”. Mimicking Camus’s philosophy of the absurd, Meursault becomes it physical manifestation that lives a life of emotional indifference and finds it difficult to coexist in this world which tends to attach meaning to life even when events don’t warrant them. Meursault, loses his Mother but he realizes that, “one more Sunday was over, that Maman was buried now, that I was going back to work, and that, really, nothing had changed”. It was this indifference of his that will ultimately prove to be the defying moment of his life though little will he know at that moment.

The book is a staunch assault on the French society which aims to attach meaning to things and events which really do not merit any explanation. Meursault therefore is a character which aims to interpret life in the most rational of manners without erecting false facades of emotions which according to him are both useless and “absurd”. This is evident from the fact that throughout the book, Meursault practices certain verbs without explaining any reason for their occurrence nor justifying in details such as when he kisses Marie “…and for no apparent reason, she laughed in such a way that I kissed her.”

Albert Camus’s summarizes this masterpiece with his own saying which echoes even to this day and ultimately sums up the true tragedy of the French society which considers the unessential and the irrational to get to the true meaning of an event:

“’In our society any man who does not weep at his mother’s funeral runs the risk of being sentenced to death.”

Rating: 5/5

Pirate Latitudes by Michael Crichton

This book review has been shared by Jamaluddin

Published after his death, legendary author Michael Crichton’s Pirate Latitudes is a cracker of read.

The year is 1665 and privateer Captain Charles Hunter from the English colony of Jamaica is out there looting rival Spanish ships when news comes in that the Spanish are repairing a Galleon filled to the brim with looted gold from the New World. It is being repaired in a near impregnable fortress commanded by the dreaded Cazalla. Naturally, this looks like an ideal outing for Captain Hunter and he along with his band of ruffians, sets out to attack the fortress, commandeer the galleon and take possession of all the gold.
Trust me when I say that it’s a pirate adventure tale filled with relentless action & heart pounding suspense.

Karachi, You’re Killing Me! by Saba Imtiaz

This book review has been shared by Areeba

Karachi you're Killing Me!

Photo by Areeba

This is the book. All fancy cover and a catchy title. Catchy for people who think if you step out in this city Karachi, some namaloom afraad will shoot you and boom go away.  This is the story about a journalist Ayesha who works in Karachi and lives with her cat & her dad who loves the cat more than her. She has a crappy boss, a job that might kill her and she drinks a lot of beer. There. Is. So. Much. Booze. As Ayesha writes about her bad days, rallies coverage. breaks up, booze, smoking, she keeps writing her diary and BAM you’re on the last page. The writer forgot to put “story” in this book. There is more booze in the book than the story. The end is pretty much Bollywoodified which no wonder was expected. A typical happy ending, finding true love on the airport and the book ends. Well, this book is more like someone’s personal life has been leaked in the most hideous way.

I am afraid people from all around the world will read this book and create an image of Karachi based on this book which is totally wrong. The story might relate to the ELITE-ELITE-ELITE class of the city that makes like 2% of the city but not to the rest of the population and people like me. In my opinion, the whole purpose of this book is to get controversial in ANYWAY. The mount of swearing & inappropriate words is way too much. You can find 10 F words in one single chapter,or maybe I’m wrong, EVEN MORE THAN THAT.

Don’t touch this book. I wish the writer hadn’t put Karachi in this book’s title.

This book review can be found on her blog.

Rating: 1/5

Written by Farman Shams Co-founder of #KHIBookSwap