20 Mar

17th #KHIBookSwap Meeting

We have selected ‘Go Set a Watchman’ as our book of the month for our 17th #KHIBookSwap meeting. As usual we gathered at Del Frio where we met our members and discussed our book of the month.

Review by Maham

Go Set A Watchman isn’t nearly as good as it’s prequel. The story lacks the depth which drew the readers so close to the first book. But keeping the prequel aside, this book is a very good read itself. It makes a few, but significant points and urges it’s readers to understand the need to evolve with society. The fact that both the stories take place 20 years apart should be enough to understand the change in principals in both the books.

Her favorite part from the book is . . .

Review by Gulzaib

Go set a watchman by Harper Lee wasn’t that intriguing to me. It wasn’t a page turner but some parts of it were actually very relatable which I’d like to share.

“Dear goodness, the things I learned. I did not want my world disturbed, but I wanted to crush the man who’s trying to preserve it for me. I wanted to stamp out all the people like him. I guess it’s like an airplane: they’re the drag and we’re the thrust, together we make the thing fly. Too much of us and we’re nose-heavy, too much of them and we’re tail-heavy—it’s a matter of balance. I can’t beat him, and I can’t join him. “

Review by me

An excellent prequel to ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’. It examines what happens to childhood ideals as people age and are affected by their surroundings and the people who inhabit them on a daily basis. When you leave home and return, hoping to find the values you remember growing up with; sometimes people change and we’re not sure whether they changed or we have.

The story takes place shortly after the Supreme Court’s Brown vs The Board of Education, saying that equal but separate educations for blacks and whites violated the constitution. We encounter a different version of Atticus Finch, a different version of the Mockingbird trial. Scout must come to terms with her father’s racism and her own perceptions their relationship. We are given additional looks at Scout’s past as she grew up in Maycomb Not having a mother who could explain what becoming a woman causes her some difficulties. The story keeps you interested and wanting a better resolution. Harper Lee wrote this book first and may not have did not really finish it. It is still a good read. My favorite paragraph from the book is as follows:

“As you grew up, when you were grown, totally unknown to yourself, you confused your father with God. You never saw him as a man with a man’s heart, and a man’s failings—I’ll grant you it may have been hard to see, he makes so few mistakes, but he makes ’em like all of us.”

There was a special #KbsSnailMail for Maham and our book of the month.

17th #KHIBookSwap Meeting

17th #KHIBookSwap Meeting

Written by Farman Shams Co-founder of #KHIBookSwap

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